Archives for posts with tag: inclusion

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I’ve written before about inclusion. I’d like to take the opportunity to bring it up again, seeing as February is “Inclusion Month.”
The term inclusion to me is tainted. It comes with so much confusion, and anxiety, when really it is SO SIMPLE!
My definition of inclusion is this : treat everyone as though they have something to contribute to your life and society around you.
Inclusion doesn’t need to be muddled with policy and paperwork and all of that jazz!
Inclusion is understanding that not everyone will be a rocket scientist, a star athlete, an ‘A’ student, a public speaker, a janitor, a McDonalds burger maker!
We all have our place in society, we are all different, we are all raised differently, we all have something to contribute!
I support “inclusive education” for my boys because, although they don’t follow typical curriculum, and can’t skate with the class, and can’t tell anyone what their favourite toy means to them, they are providing everyone around them a sense of life without a voice and limited motor abilities. They are living life with COMPLETE joy. They demonstrate LOVE for EVERY. SINGLE. HUMAN. BEING!
This generation which we are raising will be the MOST tolerant yet!! They will understand and whole heartedly accept that WE ARE ALL SPECIAL!
I am so grateful for my family every single day. Even though there are great challenges, I know that I am surrounded by something special.
I know it is difficult to change the misconceptions and attitudes we have been raised with, but understand how simple the term is.
Please, I ask, ponder it for just a moment and share the word.

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A popular term or phrase in the last decade or so, has be “inclusion.”
To every single person, it can mean something different, and in every context as well. I don’t want to get into the technicalities or definitions of inclusion, but share perspective.
I recently had a conversation with a fellow PTA mom at my kids school. After an afternoon of telling our story ( we had never had a moment for her to ask her questions), she paused.
She asked, “Can I tell you something?”
I urged her to do so.
She told me that she was so thrilled and honoured to have her daughter in the same class as my boys and her other children in the school. She explained that my boys, and my family have given her family a great gift of understanding and compassion that no one else could teach. No teacher or no program could give her daughter that.
THIS is what inclusion is about in my books.
NOT my boys being a involved in something, BUT others being involved in my boys.
NOT my boys working themselves into a world they don’t fit into always, BUT others understanding and learning and taking something from THEIR evolving worlds.

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