Archives for posts with tag: inclusion

I put off watching the movie Wonder for a long time. I don’t think it takes a rocket scientist to figure out why. I knew this movie would potentially hit me HARD.

My daughter convinced me to purchase the pre-release and have a movie night.

Part One

I was instantly hit with emotions and ones that I didn’t expect. I surprised myself by instantly judging this family for homeschooling their son for so many years, and THEN deciding to integrate him into middle school.

I was thankful for the strength and support we received when registering the boys for school, and that the idea of keeping them home never occurred.

What I’ve learned, and what I feel we’ve done right, is building an accepting and open, honest relationship around the boys and school. Inclusion isn’t even a term we use anymore, it’s a way of being.

The students are excepting of the fact that the boys are different, and I truly believe that they are all more tolerant of each other because of it. They have grown with understanding that we all bring unique strengths and needs to the table and everyone has value. These kids love and support my guys and want them included in everything, and do their best to make it happen.

The benefits of having “Special Needs” kids included in mainstream education far outways any reason not to, in my opinion.

Part 2

The other thing that really hit me with this movie was the sibling piece. My heart used to ache for our daughter. One of my most painful days was when she exclaimed, “Why can’t my brothers be like everyone else’s brothers!”

The impact (in the movie) on the sister was visible.

We’ve always made certain that our girl was never given responsibilities out of normal sister responsibilities. Although she retrieved diapers and wipes for us for far too many years!

We’ve always tried to make her feel special in her own right, but she’s taken the back seat time and again. She’s become (or maybe always has been) one of the most beautiful, compassionate and kind people I know. The more we move on this journey, the more I know we’re doing ok, that she is going to be okay. I’m confident that we’ve given her the tools she needs to continue to be an awesome person!

The movie depicts some jealousy or resentment perhaps, and I don’t doubt that will happen more than a few times in our girl’s life. I then think to “normal” sibling relationships and am pretty sure that’s happening in those ones too!

Putting it altogether, this movie pulled and yanked at my heart, I think because it was so true to the emotion I have felt in the past 10 years. I appreciate that it has provided a perspective to those not in this world, a tiny glimpse into what a rollercoaster we ride.

And what a ride it is!

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I’ve written before about inclusion. I’d like to take the opportunity to bring it up again, seeing as February is “Inclusion Month.”
The term inclusion to me is tainted. It comes with so much confusion, and anxiety, when really it is SO SIMPLE!
My definition of inclusion is this : treat everyone as though they have something to contribute to your life and society around you.
Inclusion doesn’t need to be muddled with policy and paperwork and all of that jazz!
Inclusion is understanding that not everyone will be a rocket scientist, a star athlete, an ‘A’ student, a public speaker, a janitor, a McDonalds burger maker!
We all have our place in society, we are all different, we are all raised differently, we all have something to contribute!
I support “inclusive education” for my boys because, although they don’t follow typical curriculum, and can’t skate with the class, and can’t tell anyone what their favourite toy means to them, they are providing everyone around them a sense of life without a voice and limited motor abilities. They are living life with COMPLETE joy. They demonstrate LOVE for EVERY. SINGLE. HUMAN. BEING!
This generation which we are raising will be the MOST tolerant yet!! They will understand and whole heartedly accept that WE ARE ALL SPECIAL!
I am so grateful for my family every single day. Even though there are great challenges, I know that I am surrounded by something special.
I know it is difficult to change the misconceptions and attitudes we have been raised with, but understand how simple the term is.
Please, I ask, ponder it for just a moment and share the word.

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A popular term or phrase in the last decade or so, has be “inclusion.”
To every single person, it can mean something different, and in every context as well. I don’t want to get into the technicalities or definitions of inclusion, but share perspective.
I recently had a conversation with a fellow PTA mom at my kids school. After an afternoon of telling our story ( we had never had a moment for her to ask her questions), she paused.
She asked, “Can I tell you something?”
I urged her to do so.
She told me that she was so thrilled and honoured to have her daughter in the same class as my boys and her other children in the school. She explained that my boys, and my family have given her family a great gift of understanding and compassion that no one else could teach. No teacher or no program could give her daughter that.
THIS is what inclusion is about in my books.
NOT my boys being a involved in something, BUT others being involved in my boys.
NOT my boys working themselves into a world they don’t fit into always, BUT others understanding and learning and taking something from THEIR evolving worlds.

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